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Food Animal / Large Animal

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Course Titles:

Immunity in the Neonatal Calf

Course Number: 13703

(1 CE) 1 Continuing Education Unit offered

Speaker: Dr. Amelia Woolums

Description: 

It’s often thought that young calves can’t respond to vaccination, but it turns out they can! However, because of their naïve immune response and the impact of maternal antibodies, vaccination of young calves is not always effective.  This presentation will review unique aspects of the immune response in the young calf, with discussion of effective approaches to vaccinating this population.

 

 


 

Consultation with Large Production Systems

Course Number: 13704

(1 CE) 1 Continuing Education Unit offered

Speaker: Dr. Max Rodibaugh

Description: 

Opportunities and challenges in working in and with large swine production systems will be explored.  Personal experiences with personnel, pigs, and management will be discussed. 

 

 


 

The Broodmare: From Breeding to Foaling

Course Number: 11741

(1 CE) 1 Continuing Education Unit offered

Speaker: Katherine Naughton

Description: 

This lecture addresses breeding management, pregnancy and foaling.

 

 


EHV-1 Myeloencephalopathy - New Insights from Recent Outbreaks

Course Number: 11962

(1 CE) 1 Continuing Education Unit offered

Speaker: Dr. Nicola Pusterla

Description: 

Equine herpesvirus-1 Myeloencephalopathy is sporadic but is a potentially devastating manifestation of EHV-1 infection. Anecdotal field evidence suggests that EHM is becoming increasingly common, leading to speculation that viruses with increased neurovirulence are circulation. This lecture will focus on the review of EHM and highlight new developments in the epidemiological, diagnostic and therapeutic field.

 

 


 

Strategic Deworming in Horses: Important Considerations and Practical Recommendations

Course Number: 11963

(1 CE) 1 Continuing Education Unit offered

Speaker: Dr. Stacy Tinkler

Description: 

This session will explore the current thoughts on parasite control in horses with an emphasis on targeted deworming and the use of fecal egg counts.  We will look at what the major parasite players are today; provide an update as to the efficacy of the existing dewormers and factors that may contribute to anthelmintic resistance, and finally special considerations when managing certain classes of horses.

 

 


Recent Insights into Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis

Course Number: 11964

(1 CE) 1 Continuing Education Unit offered

Speaker: Dr. Nicola Pusterla

Description: 

Sarcocystis neurona is the most common etiologic agent identified as a cause of EPM, but similar parasites, including Neospora hughesi, have also been identified. Although EPM has been recognized since 1970 and most equine practitioners in North America are routinely confronted with this neurologic disease, several issues are still encountered, including ante-mortem diagnostic modalities to support a diagnosis, prevention and treatment. This lecture will review established knowledge of EPM and also present new developments of the epidemiology, serological testing and treatment of this disease.

 

 


Equine Proliferative Enteropathy: Infection by Lawsonia Intracellularis

Course Number: 11965

(1 CE) 1 Continuing Education Unit offered

Speaker: Dr. Nicola Pusterla

Description: 

Equine proliferative Enteropathy caused by the organism Lawsonia Intracellularis is considered a true emerging disorder affecting weanling foals. Many aspects of this disease have remained poorly characterized. This lecture will review the basic understanding of this disease and also expand on actual knowledge of epidemiology, natural reservoir host, animal model and disease prevention.

 

 


Tick-Borne Diseases in Horses

Course Number: 11966

(1 CE) 1 Continuing Education Unit offered

Speaker: Dr. Nicola Pusterla

Description: 

The role of ticks and their capability to transmit infectious pathogens is increasingly recognized in the veterinary medical field. Horses are not spared from the ill-effect of tick-borne diseases.  Although some tick-borne diseases such as equine granulocytic anaplasmosis and equine piroplasmosis are well established, others, including equine bartonellosis and Lyme disease, have remained poorly characterized. This lecture will give a review on common and less common tick-born disease of horses.